(RE)turning


In this podcast, we visit the topic of turning and returning: how one turns away from darker points in our lives.

The Hebrew word for “repentance” is t’shuvah­, which literally means to turn (around). It implies an act of will, and also the notion of not simply turning, but REturning to a better state.

In this episode, we hear stories that open some of those darker spaces, and the ways that people might respond to that darkness. Philip Rose, our guest, will share a personal story that he uses in his transformational work; Titi Ogunnaike will share a cautionary children’s tale from the Yoruba that might remind some of us of the Brothers Grimm; and I will share a story of a very dark place from the canon of the Baal Shem Tov.

We’ll also enjoy a surprise personal snippet from Phil about being audacious.

Tracking

  • Philip Rose, an introduction
  • My Mother’s Courage, by Philip Rose
  • The Singing Bow, by Titi Ogunnaike
  • How I Transform Stories, by Philip Rose
  • The Forgotten Story, by Jim Brulé
  • A Pearl of Wisdom, by Philip Rose
  • Syrup, about Saul Alinsky

Contributors and Thanks

Phil Rose
Philip Rose

Philip Rose is a counselor and storyteller with a varied history of faith communities. He tells stories from his personal life to inspire others, especially youth.

Titi Ogunnaike
Titi Ogunnaike

Titi Ogunnaike is an emerging storyteller from Lagos, Nigeria. Her plans include a North American tour where she will regale audiences with traditional folktales from Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya, dressed in the style of each country.

 Thanks to musician, producer, and mensch Joe Eglash for composing, performing, and recording our theme music.

Transformational Storytelling, the home for short courses, onsite programs, and master training in transformational storytelling.

Transformational Humor


In this podcast, we visit the world of humorous stories – and how they can be transformational.

Many times, when we imagine a transformational story, we think of something deep, with layers of meaning that are soul-stirring, full of emotional moments and archetypic characters, plot, and setting. However, light-hearted stories can be full of healing in unexpected ways; and healing, after all, is an important kind of transformation.

In this episode, we hear stories that lift our souls with joy and a little mischief. One, a story from the canon of Hershel of Ostropol, is told by our guest, Hanita Blair, who also shares her more serious thoughts on how a storyteller must connect with their audience. I share a short collection of the tales of the city of Chelm, a place more fictional than real (although it is found in modern Poland).

We also discuss the ways in which humor can actually be an important source of transformation.

Tracking

  • Introduction, and a taste of things to come.
  • Just Like My Father, Hanita Blair’s Hershel of Ostropol story…
  • Hanita Blair’s thoughts about storytelling and audiences.
  • The Mikveh, three short stories from the mythical land of Chelm.
  • Humor and Transformation, a chance to think differently about light-hearted tales.
  • Pearls of Wisdom, our recurring segment of advice from this week’s guest.
  • Introduction, and a taste of things to come.
  • Just Like My Father, Hanita Blair’s Hershel of Ostropol story…
  • Hanita Blair’s thoughts about storytelling and audiences.
  • The Mikveh, three short stories from the mythical land of Chelm.
  • Humor and Transformation, a chance to think differently about light-hearted tales.
  • Pearls of Wisdom, our recurring segment of advice from this week’s guest.

Contributors and Thanks

Hanita Blair
Hanita Blair

Hanita Blair is a storyteller and musician – a minstrel in the true sense of the word. She is also an author and holds degrees in ethnomusicology and illustration. Please consider acquiring her album, “Minstrel.”

Thanks to musician, producer, and mensch Joe Eglash for composing, performing, and recording our theme music.

Transformational Storytelling, the home for short courses, onsite programs, and master training in transformational storytelling.

Stories from Other Cultures


In this podcast, we visit an enticing but controversial topic – telling stories from cultures other than our own.

Stories have cultural values buried deep within them. Sometimes those values are explicit, but more often than not, they can be simply assumed and never specifically taught. We are under a special obligation to take care when sharing some other culture’s story: do we have a sufficient understanding to tell it authentically? Will the audience understand those values?

In this episode, we hear stories from three cultures: Japanese, West African,  and Kalahari. Each is told by a different storyteller, including our emerging storyteller from Nigeria, a guest to be featured in a future episode from Poland, South Africa, and Los Angeles, and a traditional folk teller from North America with an unusual background (a PhD in Botany) and an incredible international reach: Fran Stallings.

We also hear from Fran and her journey through storytelling and her pearls of wisdom for storytellers.

Tracking

  • Introduction, and a taste of things to come.
  • Fran Stallings’ recollections of her journey through storytelling.
  • The Melting Grass, Fran Stallings’ Japanese story…
  • The Magic Drum, a traditional West African story told by Titi Ogunnaike.
  • The Farmer and the Star Woman, a Kalahari story, told by a surprise guest, Leonia Kurgan.
  • Cultural Appropriation, a reflection on the particular challenges of story sharing from different cultures.
  • Pearls of Wisdom, our recurring segment of advice from this week’s guest.
  • Upcoming next week: another taste of what is to come!

Contributors and Thanks

Fran Stallings
Fran Stallings

Fran Stallings is an American storyteller who has performed at national and international storytelling festivals, in schools and libraries, and on the radio. She performs primarily folktales from around the world. She has produced several audio recordings and books of stories.  She conducts workshops, residencies, and festival performances throughout the United States and overseas. Please visit her website.

Titi Ogunnaike
Titi Ogunnaike

Titi Ogunnaike is an emerging storyteller from Lagos, Nigeria. Her plans include a North American tour where she will regale audiences with traditional folktales from Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya, dressed in the style of each country.

Leonia Kallir Kurgan
Leonia Kallir Kurgan

Leonia Kallir Kurgan is a maggidah, a psychoanalyst,  a certified psychodramatist, and a storyteller. You can find her memoir, “A Crowd of One,” on Amazon here.

Thanks to musician, producer, and mensch Joe Eglash for composing, performing, and recording our theme music.

Transformational Storytelling, the home for short courses, onsite programs, and master training in transformational storytelling.

Folktales


In this podcast we visit Folktales – stories passed on in a tradition in an oral fashion: they shift a little from teller to teller and audience to audience, but without significant changes. However, the shifts are critical – they’re what help keep the story alive.

Folktales may have an embedded value – just part of the subtext – or the value may be the whole point of the story. And of course, there’s a lot of stories in the middle ground!

Today we hear three stories of each type, from three cultures: West African, Afghan, and American. Each will be told by a different storyteller, including an emerging storyteller from Nigeria and a traditional folk teller from North America with over 6,000 audiences to his credit: Papa Joe.

We also hear from Papa Joe and his journey through storytelling, and his pearls of wisdom for storytellers.

Tracking

  • Introduction, and a taste of things to come.
  • Papa Joe’s recollections of his journey through storytelling.
  • Hovia, Hovia! Papa Joe’s spooky story…
  • The Tortoise and the Dog, a traditional West African story told by Titi Ogunnaike.
  • The Wooden Sword, a story from Afghanistan, told by yours truly.
  • Pearls of Wisdom, our recurring segment of advice from this week’s guest.
  • Upcoming next week: another taste of what is to come!

Contributors and Thanks

 

Papa Joe
Papa Joe

Papa Joe Gaudet’s living folktales have engaged over 6,000 audiences. He has captured family audiences from Cow Head, Newfoundland to Austin, Texas, from the beaches in Florida to the mountains of Washington State. Please visit his website.


Titi Ogunnaike
Titi Ogunnaike

Titi Ogunnaike is an emerging storyteller from Lagos, Nigeria. Her plans include a North American tour where she will regale audiences with traditional folktales from Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya, dressed in the style of each country.

Thanks to musician, producer, and mensch Joe Eglash for composing, performing, and recording our theme music.

Transformational Storytelling, the home for short courses, onsite programs, and master training in transformational storytelling.

Introducing “Storytelling Matters”


Welcome to the inaugural episode of “Storytelling Matters.” In this episode, you’ll hear a story from me, Maggid Jim Brulé, and two stories from Kohenet Rinah Rachel Galper. In these stories – and my interviews with Rinah Rachel – we’ll explore what a transformational story is, as well as how who we are presents us with challenges and opportunities to craft and tell such stories.

Continue reading “Introducing “Storytelling Matters””